David Mathar

David Mathar

for­mer PhD can­di­date

   

David stud­ied math­e­mat­ics at the TU Kaiser­slautern until 2008. In his mas­ter the­sis he ana­lyzed the earth’s grav­i­ty sig­nal derived from satel­lite mea­sure­ments. He was inter­est­ed in detect­ing local grav­i­ty field anom­alies in areas with strong vol­canic activ­i­ty (e.g. Ice­land, Hawaii) uti­liz­ing so called Wavelets. As a lat­er­al entrant in the field of neu­ro­science, he focus­es on obe­si­ty-relat­ed alter­ations in reward-based learn­ing and cost-ben­e­fit deci­sion-mak­ing process­es. Specif­i­cal­ly, in his lat­est PhD project he’s aim­ing at reveal­ing if obese sub­jects show alter­ations in the trade-off between phys­i­cal effort as a form of costs and dif­fer­ent types of rewards (e.g. high-caloric snacks, mon­ey, etc.) dur­ing cost-ben­e­fit deci­sions. Beside basic behav­ioral mea­sure­ments, he uses func­tion­al mag­net­ic res­o­nance imag­ing (fMRI) tech­niques to detect the neur­al cor­re­lates that under­lie the behav­ioral obser­va­tions.

Publications

Kube, J., Math­ar, D., Horstmann, A., Kotz, S. A., Vill­ringer, A., & Neu­mann, J. (2017). Altered mon­e­tary loss pro­cess­ing and rein­force­ment-based learn­ing in indi­vid­u­als with obe­si­ty. Brain Imag­ing and Behav­ior. doi:10.1007/s11682-017‑9786-8.
[Item] [File 1]

Math­ar, D., Neu­mann, J., Vill­ringer, A., & Horstmann, A. (2017). Fail­ing to learn from neg­a­tive pre­dic­tion errors: Obe­si­ty is asso­ci­at­ed with alter­ations in a fun­da­men­tal neur­al learn­ing mech­a­nism. Cor­tex, 95, 222–237. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2017.08.022.
[Item]

Mühlberg, C., Math­ar, D., Vill­ringer, A., Horstmann, A., & Neu­mann, J. (2016). Stop­ping at the sight of food – How gen­der and obe­si­ty impact on response inhi­bi­tion. Appetite, 107, 663–676. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.08.121.
[Item]

Math­ar, D., Wilkin­son, L., Holl, A., Neu­mann, J., Deser­no, L., Vill­ringer, A., Jahan­shahi, M., & Horstmann, A. (2016). The role of dopamine in pos­i­tive and neg­a­tive pre­dic­tion error uti­liza­tion dur­ing inci­den­tal learn­ing: Insights from Positron Emis­sion Tomog­ra­phy, Parkinson’s dis­ease and Huntington’s dis­ease. Cor­tex. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2016.09.004.
[Item] [Loca­tor 1]

Diet­rich, A., Holl­mann, M., Math­ar, D., Vill­ringer, A., & Horstmann, A. (2016). Brain reg­u­la­tion of food crav­ing: Rela­tion­ships with weight sta­tus and eat­ing behav­ior. Inter­na­tion­al Jour­nal of Obe­si­ty, 982–989. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.28.
[Item] [Loca­tor 1]

Math­ar, D., Horstmann, A., Pleger, B., Vill­ringer, A., & Neu­mann, J. (2016). Is it worth the effort? Nov­el insights into obe­si­ty-asso­ci­at­ed alter­ations in cost-ben­e­fit deci­sion-mak­ing. Fron­tiers in Behav­ioral Neu­ro­science, 9: 360. doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00360.
[Item] [File 1][Loca­tor 1]

Horstmann, A., Diet­rich, A., Math­ar, D., Poes­sel, M., Vill­ringer, A., & Neu­mann, J. (2015). Slave to habit? Obe­si­ty is asso­ci­at­ed with decreased behav­iour­al sen­si­tiv­i­ty to reward deval­u­a­tion. Appetite, 87, 175–183. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2014.12.212.
[Item] [File 1][File 2]

Horstmann, A., Busse, F. P., Math­ar, D., Mueller, K., Lep­sien, J., Schlögl, H., Kabisch, S., Kratzsch, J., Neu­mann, J., Stumvoll, M., Vill­ringer, A., & Pleger, B. (2011). Obe­si­ty-relat­ed dif­fer­ences between women and men in brain struc­ture and goal-direct­ed behav­ior. Fron­tiers in Human Neu­ro­science, 5: 58. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2011.00058.
[Item]